How to Have Fun With Online Poker

Everyone in this world wants to achieve success and happiness. No one can ignore the importance of setting goals and live life with discipline. But it is not necessary that we gain success and satisfaction by extensive studying, setting goals and living with discipline and bankroll management. Working intensively and purposefully can sometimes be boring and painful experience for us. Some people can find results and rewards out of it but they actually don’t enjoy it. It can be an important way to motivate ourselves to work hard but no motivation is as powerful as having fun.

We can earn a lot of money and have fun while playing Poker. The popularity of Poker is increasing worldwide day by day. It is a fast track to riches and glory. A disciplined and intelligent person can be more successful at poker. It is a better option than working for some company the whole day and earning a small amount of money. Playing poker is enjoyable in order to make money. We must play on the first two cards, the free card, semi-bluffing, inducing bluffs, playing when a pair flops, staying with a draw, playing trash hands, playing in wild games, desperation bets, reading hands, psychology of a player and much more.

We must not find ourselves frustrated on a longer downswing at the poker table because playing with the feeling of anger or frustration is wrong. We must try to be happy and relaxed by facial expression as there are relationships between facial expressions and state of mind. If we are happy, our brain will subconsciously be a little happier. We can also read the books on Poker with great explanations on how a hand is being played. The thinking process mentioned in this book can easily be applied to both cash games and live tournament. Also, making friends among other poker players is a good idea. Doing so will bring us a social side otherwise it will be a loner’s game. Those friends will support us through our bad times and help us to develop in the good runs.

We must play in certain why to make a difference and win. We should cash out some portion of our winnings and does something fun for it. We can go out and see a movie, go for a long trip or buy a computer or a DVD player. There are many ways to get enjoyment out of the game. We have to figure this out for ourselves. We should not neglect the fun sides of the game. Being at a good state of mind will make everything easier and will allow us to keep it up. No job is worth being miserable and poker is no exception. It teaches us to be our own boss, earn money and have fun.

Online Poker Games – Game Point And Advantage

A game which has rules is an online poker game, where each game has a specific set of rules that differ between every casino on the net or website’s setting. The main attraction of an online poker match as the most-played game is because rules can vary slightly between one place and another, and yet it will still follow the main guidelines which allow everyone to feel comfortable with the game along with its guidelines to play.

But, there must be an accepted bunch of rules which each of the players may refer to if confusion sets in. This is why free tutorials have been made available on the net along with books on how to go about playing an online poker game. Offering the player instructions about how to play the game is what these books do, either online or real life. These tutorials provide tips to beat the opponent, when you must risk your cards and when you should hold them.

Poker games online are always so popular. Why is it so? Poker games on the net help the beginners learn to play the game in their own speed with the free software. If they think they are game to playing with others, online poker websites are the thing for them. Online poker games allow novices to gamble as little as 1¢ with free poker rolls to anyone who enter into the table without fee. The attractions in online game rooms are that players need not feel all that pressure from the rest of the players to perform without committing mistakes.

Playing poker games online will hone your probability skills, improve computing capabilities, propagates social inter reaction and teaches one how to play well. The type of players that the casino casts out (novices), the poker that?s online embraces. That is the main reason for the online poker to be one of the largest collectors of revenue from online casinos.

Despite all the benefits provided by online poker, a chief concern is

Like the professional casinos at Las Vegas, a watchful eye is present before each poker room. This “eye” checks for illegitimacy. Online poker games’ security checks out the IP address that belongs to a computer unit to confirm that not more than one unit play the game; thereby illegitimate game play is avoided.

Mainstream poker sites get players hooked by conducting tournaments. The winners of the poker tournament get a chance to try out real poker in casinos that host the programme. Tournaments may make players play at the World Series Poker Championship Games. Better your skills more are the chances of you winning a prize. As far as test of skills is concerned, these poker websites make it possible to play with real masters of the game.

Because of all these advantages, it isn’t a surprise that poker on the net is a successful business. But being a champion varies in the real world. Real poker can distract you when you are playing. The acclaimed “poker face” must be perfected before an online poker player can take on real poker. Online poker does not teach us that.

Apart from misleading your counterpart physically; there is no difference between playing on the net or playing a real game of poker. poker on the net and the real game are about betting cash.

The main advantage in playing poker online is the absence of intimidating opponents. Because you are new to the game, it helps to not have opponents present as it helps you improve your skills.

After you have become comfortable with the game play, you may sign up with various websites to play the game. Your first game can be quite challenging especially if you haven’t got the hang of it yet. Although, you will get better at the game when other players play and everything becomes clearer.

But the only thing that remains unchanged in any poker game is the prevalence of addiction in any form of gambling. The game revolves around taking risks, playing with guts and paying due attention for your skills and ultimately winning once or twice.

Even then it’s still the poker games online that attract novices everyday. The internet destroys all barriers of space, time and race; in this world, there is no better feeling than to win at the game!

The Game of Draw Poker – A Brief History

In many ways, the game epitomizes the raw bone tenacity of the American spirit that drove the western movement from the Mississippi River in the 1800’s. Life on the frontier was harsh, hazardous and full of risks – the pioneers were literally gambling on their lives each day. To both survive in the untamed west and to win at draw poker a man had to be skillful at what he did and count on lady luck to smile on him. He had to closely watch his adversaries and at times bluff his way out of a situation. The results of his actions could prove very profitable or he could lose it all, sometimes even his life. Draw poker then was a natural choice for the men of the American west who were used to risking it all.

The game was the result of an evolutionary process that started when poker was first took shape in America early in the nineteenth-century. Just when and where it was first played is subject to a continuing debate among historians, as is the game’s origins. Several postulations attribute the game’s lineage to a French game called “poque” or possibly to a German game known as “pochspiel.” British historians state that the game was a direct descendent of the English card game of “brag.” Still other researchers claim that poker evolved from a sixteen-century Persian card game called “as nas” that was played with a twenty-five-card deck containing five suites and has rules similar to five-card stud poker. Since exact documentation of poker’s early history is impossible to determine its inception will probably remain a mystery.

Poker is thought to have started in America sometime in the early 1800’s, possibly in saloons of New Orleans. From there it spread up the Mississippi and Ohio rivers by way of the commercial steam boat traffic. Then as the wagon trains and railroads pushed the frontier west, poker continued to gain popularity with the early adventurers. An English actor, Joseph Crowell, recorded seeing poker being played on the riverboats in his diary of 1829 and later in his 1844 book, Thirty Years Passed Among the Players in England and America. A reformed gambler by the name of Jonathan H. Green wrote about early poker in his book, Exposure of the Arts and Miseries of Gambling that was published in 1843. Both men described an early version of poker that was played with a twenty-card deck (A-K-Q-J-10). Each of four players was dealt five cards and bets were placed on these five original cards without discards or draws. When the betting was over the owner of the best hand won the pot – in the order of one pair, two pair, triplets, full house (one pair and a triple), and four of a kind. Due to the limits of a twenty-card deck there was only a single round of betting before the winning hand was declared and this made bluffing a much more difficult maneuver.

As the game evolved it moved to a thirty-two card deck and then eventually to the standard “French deck” of fifty-two cards. Sometime in the mid-1830’s straights and flushes were introduced as winning hands. A few years later draw poker was born and started making the rounds of gambling halls in the west. The first mention of draw poker appeared in the American edition of Bohn’s New Handbook of Games in 1850. In that same year, wild cards were introduced to poker play.

With these enhancements draw poker and another version called stud poker became the card games of choice among the soldiers on both sides of the Civil War. Originally called, “stud horse” poker, the game was played around the campfires between battles and was a close rival to draw poker in popularity. Both versions are conducive to bluffing but in stud poker, you are not allowed to draw or discard cards. Rather, some of the cards are dealt face down and some face up to the player so that everyone at the table knows a few of the cards being held by each player. Betting occurs after each new face up card is dealt and after the last face down card is dealt. The first mention of stud poker appeared in the American Hoyle of 1864.

In draw poker all the cards are dealt face down to the players and after all of the cards have been dealt there is a round of betting. Then players may discard any number of cards and receive the same amount of cards from the dealer. When all the players have completed their hands there is another round of betting before the winner is declared. Later, in 1870, jackpot poker was introduced in an attempt to prevent players with poor hands from being drawn into a pot that was impossible to win. In this version, players were required to have jacks or better to open betting. If a player did not possess the minimum to play, they were required to fold and lose their ante.

The first recorded set of rules for playing draw poker came about when Robert C. Scheneck, a United States ambassador to Great Britain, introduced the game to the members of Queen Victoria’s court at a party in 1872. Fascinated with the new game the royalty asked Scheneck to jot down the rules of the game so they could play the game after he returned to America. He obliged and his handwritten rules of play were then printed by the queen’s staff for future parties. Later, without his permission or that of the queen’s court, his set of rules were published as a small booklet and sold to the masses. Entitled, A Flowery Path to Wealth: The Game of Draw Poker as Taught to the English Aristocracy, the pamphlet was a major hit with the British people who quite often referred to the game as “Scheneck’s poker”. Scheneck, who had served as general under President Lincoln, was embarrassed by the public release of his rules that he had been assured would be used privately by queen’s court.

John W. Keller, an American, included Scheneck’s rules for draw poker in his own book, The Game of Draw Poker, published in 1887. In addition, he used a portion of a letter written by Scheneck to a political friend, Thomas L. Young; to describe how the ambassador had unwittingly became party to the publication of the first set of rules for the game.

Keller’s book provided a more detailed account of the rules and variations to the game as well as a section on progressive poker, which he described as being “The latest development of draw poker… and doubtless owes its origin to the popularity of progressive euchre.” Contrary to Keller’s comments, progressive poker never caught the attention of American gamblers and its play quickly faded from the gaming scene.

Throughout the book, Keller refers to a noted mathematician, “Dr. Pole” who provided the probability and odds for draw poker hands. At the end of the book, he summarizes Pole’s calculations in a series of probability tables, which have stood the test of time. According to Dr. Poe’s figures, there is an astounding 2,598,960 possible hands in draw poker.

Since Keller’s book was published in 1887, there have been a large number of books printed on the subject of draw poker but few have been as clear and concise on the rules and the strategy of the game. His sage advice to “Study your adversaries carefully; watch the game closely; be patient in adversity and calm in prosperity,” seems right in keeping with the old gambler’s adage of knowing “when to hold ’em and when to fold ’em.”

Poker Timeline:

1839 – English comedic actor Joseph Crowell wrote about a poker game being played on the steamboat Helen M,Gregor, bound for New Orleans. He described a game called poker being played by four players using 20 cards (A, K,Q, J, 10) with a single round of betting – highest hand won. In his book, Thirty Years Passed Among the Players in England and America (1844), Crowell said that the game had been invented by the American politician, Henry Clay. The game was based on the British game, brag.

1834 – Jonathan H. Green, a professional gambler turned reformer, wrote about the “cheating game” called poker being played on the Mississippi riverboats in his book entitled, Exposure of the Arts and Miseries of Gambling.

1836 – J. Hildreth wrote about poker in his book, Dragoon Campaigns of the Rocky Mountains.

1837 – Poker used a 52-card deck. Straights and flushes were added.

1845 – Poker was first mentioned in an American edition of Hoyle’s Games. (The gold standard for the rules of card games) by Henry F. Anners.

1850 – First mention of draw poker in the American edition of Bohn’s New Handbook of Games.

1850 – Wild cards introduced to poker.

1861- 1866 – During the Civil War, soldiers and others made stud and draw poker the most popular form of the game.

1864 – First mention of stud or “stud-horse” poker in the American Hoyle of 1864.

1872 – Robert C. Scheneck, U.S. minister to Great Britain, introduced the game of draw poker to the members of the court of Queen Victoria at a royal party. He was asked to write down the rules of the game and eventually this was turned into a small booklet. The booklet was published without his permission and called, A Flowery Path to Wealth: The Game of Draw poker as Taught to the English Aristocracy. Scheneck had been an army general under President Lincoln.

1870 – Jackpot poker (jacks or better to open) introduced to prevent players with a poor hand from being drawn into an impossible to win pot.

1875 – The joker (a European invention) was introduced to the game as a wild card.

Poker Book Report Wars: Arnold Snyder Challenges David Sklansky

Arnold Snyder is not new to gambling, but he is a new writing force in the world of poker. Having recently written a ground breaking tournament poker manual, he has ignited a debate of old school verses new school, aggression versus conceding, and blunt force betting verses the fear of losing. With the publication of The Poker Tournament Formula, Snyder has captured a loyal and expanding audience of strategy-hungry tournament players that contribute to Snyder’s online forum like packs of wolves, frequently taking frisky bites at the old school tournament thinkers.

Collectively, those thinkers are represented (at least ideologically) by David Sklansky the resident professor and writer of Tournament Poker for Advanced Players. This book, now several years since its first publication, and before the boom, put into motion the tight-early and tight-aggressive strategy that simply made common sense of hold’em tournaments. This strategy is guided in nature by the Gap Concept described in Sklansky’s book as “you need a better hand to play against someone who has already opened the betting, than you would need to open yourself”. Even modern superstar writers like Dan Harrington and Phil Gordon use this in their strategies as well, so you know it has to have some merit. As such, it is not unusual to find that squeaky, tight-aggressive player at numerous final tables that has got enough playable cards during the tournament to have survived to the final table.

Survived is the key word here, as he (insert any Sklansky drone) is rarely among the chip leaders. Further, rarely does the player return to a final table, because the basic tight strategy of relying on enough quality hands also has to be fused with having them actually win pots, and hold up throughout the tournament. As Snyder points out with much experience, it is those “quality” hands he gets kicked out of tournaments playing, as opposed to position plays with weak holdings.

Where Snyder feels The Gap is a completely misguided concept is in the smaller buy-in tournaments that many players participate daily, in local casinos, regional events and online poker sites. Snyder feels that this is a lucrative segment, as many players may never have a bankroll big enough for $10,000 and $15,000 entry fees for the WPT and WSOP. However, if you play these smaller tourneys the way Snyder plays them, you will soon enough be able to pay for a $10,000 entry fee!

Snyder breaks these smaller tournaments down, and categorizes them into a skill level based on the chip and blind structure combined with the amount of entries. Depending on the skill level and patience factor of the tournament, your strategy is going to be radically different than anything Sklansky would recommend. The underlining of that strategy is based largely on position play, and pressuring your opponents, who have likely missed the flop as much as you have. This is executed in spite of your hole cards, not because of them. Snyder’s wolves say this strategy works it sheer numbers in large part because of the Sklansky type tournament opponents who know nothing more than to fold out of position or out of flop weakness.

Both writers have forums and both have supporters, and it is interesting to hear some of the challenges put forth from the Snyder Wolves – “specific mistakes in Sklansky’s and Malmuth’s advice”, “I’ve been giving a lot of thought to the “Gap Concept” and why it’s wrong.”, “Waiting for Sklansky to speak”, ” The burden of proof was Sklansky’s, and all he did was add to his errors”, “Sklansky’s “proof” is a perfect example of his incompetence at poker logic” and on and on. This is juicy stuff!

All I can say is, between the two of them, someone has got to know what is going on here! All we want to know is how to win a bloody tournament! It seems to me that elements of both strategies are needed to win tournaments. Take a look at players like Daniel Negreneau, Erick Lindgren, Gus Hansen, Greg Raymer or Gavin Smith. They have often made some amazing lay downs to aggressive opponents, but I more often see them playing stuff like QJos, 57s, KTs and even more rubbish hands to not just one raiser, but two! These guys truly understand, like Arnold Snyder, that if you laid down like Sklansky does, you are just not going to see many final tables. By the way, have you seen David Sklansky at a final table recently?

All of the above tournament players, who are definitely more tuned into Snyder’s slant have won big, and won often. Yes, I want some of that.

Poker Book Review – All In – An E-guide To No Limit Texas Hold’em by Amarillo Slim Preston

I am really not much of a book reviewer but I would like to share this with you. While visiting Amarillo Slim’s new website http://amarilloslim.org I came across Amarillo Slim’s new ebook, All In: An E-guide To No Limit Texas Hold’em, I believe it to be the greatest and most educational book on poker yet. With so many books about poker on the market at first I was skeptical, figuring old Slim was just trying to cash in on the poker craze like everyone else but then I read the book and found It is just simply written and easy to understand. The chapter on hand odds is worth the price of the book, much less the starting hands and tells chapters that give a special insight to a great poker mind at work and a story you will not want to miss. this book also dives into many other aspects of poker including psychology, table position, and of course finding games you can beat. This book was not only informative but very entertaining.

So if you are looking for some good reading or a poker lesson that you actually learn something from, this is the book for you.

Amarillo Slim Preston is a true poker legend, member of five halls of fame, winner of five WSOP bracelets, including the WSOP Championship in 1972. Besides poker, he is also known as a world class billiard’s player and one of the most publicized proposition gamblers in history, making him one of the most successful and recognizable gamblers the world has ever known.